Monthly Archives: September 2013

EUGMS Website and EUGMS Blog

Dr Arturo Vilches-Moraga is a geriatrician based in Vigo in Northwest Spain. He serves on the Executive Board of the EUGMS and is the EUGMS Website Director.      

The EUGMS has three websites:blog_tree

  • Main EUGMS website: www.eugms.org
  • This one, the EUGMS Blog
  • The EUGMS Congress website (which is controlled and run by the congress secretariat

http://www.eugms.org/, as the forefront of Geriatric Medicine in Europe, receives on average over 9000 visits per month from Geriatricians across Europe, Asia, The Americas, Africa, Australia and Oceania.  We envisage our website as the place to visit when you want to find out what is happening in Geriatric Medicine in Europe but also as the communication platform for Geriatricians. Continue reading

What role can social media play in healthcare?

Victoria Betton is a social media & mental health PhD researcher, Deputy Director at Leeds & York NHS PFT. She tweets at @VictoriaBetton and blogs atdigitalmentalhealth.co.uk. Re-blogged from the BGS blog.betton

Social media is the term used for online platforms which enable people to consume information as well as produce their own content – from 140 character updates on Twitter through to sharing photos on Instagram, and much more besides. Whether we use social networks or not, they are increasingly incorporated into day to day life, and not just for younger people:  Age UK report that the number of 55-64 year old internet users creating a social network profile rose by almost half last year, and many use social networking to keep in touch with family and friends and to reduce social isolation. Continue reading

Driving with Dementia

Professor Joseph E Ibrahim (MBBS, GradCertHE, PhD, FRACP, FAFPHM) of The Victoria and Tasmania Dementia Training Study Centre and Monash University introduces his short animation about people with dementia who want to continue to drive. (This was first blogged on the BGS Blog site).

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Assessing a patient’s fitness to continue driving a motor vehicle following a diagnosis of dementia presents an important personal, professional and community challenge. The revocation of a person’s license is a traumatic event that significantly impacts on their quality of life. This is especially so for patients who are living in regional and rural areas. This animated video addresses some of the complex issues involved in assessing whether a person with dementia is fit to drive. Continue reading

Stressful life events significantly raise the risk of falls in older men

A study of around 5,000 older men has shown that stressful life events such as death of a loved one, or serious financial problems, significantly raised the risk of falls in the year following the incident. The research is published in the journal Age and Ageing. (First blogged on the BGS blog)shutterstock_68989549

Dr Howard A. Fink of the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis and colleagues conducted a study of 5,994 community-dwelling men over the age of 65 who were enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study in six locations across the United States. 5,125 participated in a second study visit and answered questions on stressful life events in the prior year. A further subset of 4,981 men reported complete data on falls for one year after the second visit. Continue reading

Insights from the older adult population: new technology perceptions

Lisa Thomas is a Senior Researcher within the Psychology and Communication Technology (PaCT) Research Group in the Department of Psychology at Northumbria University. They tweet at @PaCTLab. (First published on the BGS blog)PactLab

In PaCT Lab at Northumbria University, the inclusion of older adults in research projects is commonplace. Digital technology holds the promise of enriching the lives of older adults, but many are still confused by it. Our research is aimed at understanding how to design technology to help older adults live healthier, more connected and socially engaged lives.  Continue reading

Hypertension in people with dementia – what should we do?

Tomas Welsh is a Clinical Lecturer in the Medicine of Older People at the University of Nottingham, England. (First blogged on the BGS blog)

Antihypertensive therapy is effective even in the oldest old. However, the large trials of antihypertensive medications, even in older people, frequently excluded people with dementia. This causes difficulties in applying these findings to many of our typical patient group.

People with dementia are more likely to be physically frail, are at higher risk of adverse events due to polypharmacy and are more likely to experience orthostatic hypotension than their cognitively intact peers.  There is reason to suspect, therefore, that the risk-benefit ratio of treating hypertension may be different in this group and many clinicians intuitively feel this to be the case.   Continue reading