Monthly Archives: November 2013

Working with GPs and Care Home staff to reduce emergency hospital admissions

R Lisk, K Yeong, A Nasim, B Mandal, R Nari, Z Dhakam presented their research at the Autumn conference of the British Geriatrics Society. Reblogged from the British Geriatrics Society blogshutterstock_45287182

Residents of Care Homes with Nursing tend to be frail, have multiple diagnoses and high levels of dependency.  This results in complex care needs. Many experience multiple admissions to hospital, often with long lengths of stay.

This initiative was aimed at reducing the number of emergency admissions to our Trust from local Care Homes with Nursing, by working in partnership with staff in the homes and local GPs.  The aim was to help provide more bespoke care for this vulnerable patient group, keeping them out of hospital whenever it was possible and appropriate to do so.  The project was also part of a Trust-wide response to the new emergency admission cap introduced through the National Operating Framework 2010/11. Continue reading

Frailsafe: A new checklist for the acute care of frail older people

Professor Tom Downes is  consultant geriatrician and has expertise in the design of acute interface geriatric care. He is the Clinical Lead for Quality Improvement at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. Saira Ghafur is a Quality Improvement and Leadership Fellow and Respiratory Registrar at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Reblogged from the British Geriatrics Society blog.

‘Something as mundane as a checklist can be a powerful tool for simplifying the complexity of the world and, in the context of medical procedures, save lives’ Atul Gawande 2010

FrailSafe

International studies have indicated that approximately 10% of all patients who are admitted to hospital suffer some form of adverse event (AE)- defined as an unintended harm to a patient resulting in injury, death or a prolonged admission.  Older people are more likely to suffer AEs and the consequences of these are often more severe in frail, older patients. Continue reading

The more you study, the later you drop – Education and terminal cognitive decline

Graciela Muniz-Terrera is a Senior Investigator Scientist at the MRC Lifelong Health and Ageing Unit at UCL. Reblogged from the British Geriatrics Society Blogshutterstock_21757213

The terminal decline hypothesis suggests an acceleration of rate of cognitive decline before death, although information about the onset of faster decline is inconsistent and varies by ability examined. The identification of factors that may delay such onset is crucial for policy implementation, as such delay would imply that individuals spend a shorter period of time in the fast declining stages of life. Education is a modifiable risk factor usually considered as a proxy for cognitive reserve that has been shown to be associated with cognitive function and, in a few American studies, has also been shown to be associated with a later onset of pre-clinical dementia. Continue reading

Award Winning Telehealth

Chief Executive of Airedale NHS Foundation Trust; Bridget Fletcher discusses how this Yorkshire Hospital is delivering unique, new and bespoke video consultation services to support patients in their own home and preventing unnecessary admissions to ED and inpatient beds. Reblogged from the British Geriatrics Society blogtelehealth

Overburdened A&E departments and hospital wards full to capacity are almost daily news items currently.  It is likely that the individual human stories behind those news items involve very many people over the age of 65 living with one or more long term conditions.  In fact statisticians tell us around 70% of our NHS resources in general are spent caring for patients living with long term conditions, much of which is re-active care rather than proactive. Continue reading

Assessment of pain in older adults with dementia – there’s an app for that

Professor Pat Schofield leads research around pain, ageing and dementia at the University of Greenwich. She is the Chair of the Pain in Older People SIG at the British Pain Society. She describes the development and initial trial of a new Pain App that is targeted at frail, older patients.  This has been re-blogged from the British Geriatrics Society blogpain app

Pain in the older population is a common problem, and can be under-recognised and under-treated. Recent prevalence studies suggest that chronic pain exists in over 50% of community dwelling older adults and this increases to over 80% when we look at those living in long term care. We also know that the incidence of dementia in the UK and the rest of the world is high and set to increase significantly over the next 20 years. Continue reading