Tag Archives: care homes

Working with GPs and Care Home staff to reduce emergency hospital admissions

R Lisk, K Yeong, A Nasim, B Mandal, R Nari, Z Dhakam presented their research at the Autumn conference of the British Geriatrics Society. Reblogged from the British Geriatrics Society blogshutterstock_45287182

Residents of Care Homes with Nursing tend to be frail, have multiple diagnoses and high levels of dependency.  This results in complex care needs. Many experience multiple admissions to hospital, often with long lengths of stay.

This initiative was aimed at reducing the number of emergency admissions to our Trust from local Care Homes with Nursing, by working in partnership with staff in the homes and local GPs.  The aim was to help provide more bespoke care for this vulnerable patient group, keeping them out of hospital whenever it was possible and appropriate to do so.  The project was also part of a Trust-wide response to the new emergency admission cap introduced through the National Operating Framework 2010/11. Continue reading

Advertisement

A Core Curriculum for Nursing Home Care

nursing_care_3d_coverJohn Morley, Professor of Geriatrics and Endocrinology at the St Louis University, Missouri, describes the work of the Taskkforce convened by the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) and the World Health Organisation, to develop a core curriculum for nursing home care.

The International Association for Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) has developed a core curriculum for nursing home care. Continue reading

Preventing falls in care homes: a question of balance

Ahead of her session at the British Geriatrics Society Falls and Postural Stability Conference in September, Kate Robertson writes with Alex Macdonald for the Geriatric Medicine blog  (re-blogged from the British Geriatrics Society blog) about falls in care homes.

shutterstock_145126204

Falls in older adults are common and the rate is three
times higher in people in care homes than in those living in their own homes. Falls in care homes are associated with considerable mortality and morbidity-hip fractures are significantly more prevalent than in community-dwelling older people, with rates in female care home residents estimated as high as 50.8 hip fractures per 1000 person-years.

Although extensive research has been carried out into interventions to reduce falls in community-dwelling older people, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of such measures within care homes. Oliver concluded that it makes sense to identify risk factors for the individual so that they can be reversed or reduced where possible. However the protocols used to perform risk assessments for falls in care homes are often not validated, vary from care home to care home, and do not necessarily trigger individually-tailored interventions. These assessments invariably attempt to stratify risk but because each individual within the care home is already at high risk, opportunities for interventions to reduce the risk of falling are often missed.

Read the full article on the GM blog here.

Health in care homes: can we do better?

Published with kind permission by the BGS blog team

Dr Adam Gordon is a Consultant and Honorary Associate Professor in Medicine of Older People at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Nottingham. He also edits this blog.

Arrangements to provide health care to UK care homes are often inadequate.  In the British Geriatrics Society’s Failing the Frail Report, based on a national survey by the Care Quality Commission, 57% of residents were reported as being unable to access all health care services required. In 2011, a collaboration of health care groups led by the British Geriatrics Society published Quest for Quality, which went so far as to describe existing arrangements as “a betrayal of older people, an infringement of their human rights and unacceptable in a civilised society”. Continue reading